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Ty Bro Dyfi

Y Plas,
Machynlleth, Powys, SY20 8ER, UK.
phone: 01654 703965
e-mail: info@ecodyfi.org.uk

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Help conserve our environment and improve our quality of life

press release13.2.04

Sustainable tourism project in Cornwall seeks inspiration from the Dyfi Valley

On February 3 2004, despite the floods, an Officer from the new Cornish Sustainable Tourism Project 'CoaST', traveled to Machynlleth on a fact-finding mission to learn from tourism developments in the Dyfi Valley.

CoaST worker Manda Brookman was hosted by Teresa Walters, Tourism Officer for local community regeneration company Ecodyfi.

The field trip included visits to various attractions and accommodation providers in the Corris area, including the Corris Craft Centre and Labyrinth, the Braich Goch Inn, the Corris Institute, tipi manufacturers and campsite owners Shelters Unlimited and the chosen site for the new Dyfi Forest mountain biking trails.

The tour ended at the Centre for Alternative Technology, where Manda met with Consultancy Co-ordinator Jacinta McDermott to learn about the centre's pioneering environmental work.

Aimed at demonstrating co-operative working in tourism - the practical side of what environmentalists call "joined up thinking" - the tour was working evidence for CoaST worker Manda that activity and accommodation provision, attractions and transport could all be integrated to produce a unique holiday experience which benefited local people.

Ms Brookman said that she found the visit "inspirational".

"It is great to see sustainable tourism in practice - to find out how local people can work together to one another's benefit, making the most of their natural resources without damaging them."

Building on the reputation of the Centre for Alternative Technology and on the area's varied natural, cultural and heritage assets, the Dyfi Valley has become a national flagship for sustainable tourism development.

Since 2002 it has been designated by the Wales Tourist Board as a Tourism Growth Area - with "sustainability" as the core of its vision. And since then, the board, together with project partners Ecodyfi, Gwynedd County Council, Powys County Council, the Welsh Development Agency, the Aberdyfi Partnership, Machynlleth Chamber of Trade and Cymad, have been working to encourage investment in sustainable tourism development in the valley.

As well as investment possibilities, the Dyfi Valley Tourism Growth Area brings the opportunity for businesses to work together in joint marketing and networking schemes and to develop the environmental and cultural sensitivity of their own operations, while promoting the area as an un-missable sustainable tourism destination.